2005-06-07

Deep Throat, Watergate und das Weiße Haus heute

--- Die LA Times geht den Auswirkungen von Watergate auf das Weißen Haus von heute nach und sieht diese vor allem in einer immensen Bemühung um Informationskontrolle und eine Blütezeit des Spindoctoring :
Shortly after a 91-year-old man was revealed last week as the answer to the 30-year-old mystery of the Watergate affair, President Bush cast the scandal as something from the distant past. "A lot of people wondered … who 'Deep Throat' was, including me," Bush said after news broke that former FBI official W. Mark Felt had been the source leaking Watergate details to the press. "It would kind of fade from my memory, and then all of a sudden, somebody would pop it back in. Some story would reinvigorate that period." And yet, far more than Bush has publicly acknowledged, Watergate and its aftermath have exerted a strong influence on the policies and attitudes of the president and others now in the White House — some of whom had front-row seats for the scandal as members of the Nixon and Ford administrations. Vice President Dick Cheney, who worked in the Nixon White House and served as chief of staff to President Ford, has spoken of using his current position to restore powers of the presidency that he believes were diminished as a result of Watergate and the Vietnam War. By withholding details of his energy task force meetings and advising Bush to aggressively take the reins of power after the contested 2000 election, Cheney has tried to rekindle a broad view of executive authority. Bush was a student at Harvard Business School when Richard Nixon resigned the presidency in 1974. He watched as his father, chairman of the Republican National Committee and one of Nixon's most visible defenders, butted heads with a press the elder Bush believed was out to get the president. Today, an arm's-length relationship with the press, a highly controlled message and a restrictive interpretation of public records laws are the norm at the Bush White House. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, a Nixon aide who also served as chief of staff to Ford, tried to stop Congress' post-Watergate broadening of the Freedom of Information Act. The act requires the government to disclose certain records to citizens. Working with Cheney, Rumsfeld persuaded Ford to veto the legislation, according to declassified documents obtained last year by the National Security Archive at Georgetown University. Congress overrode Ford's veto. Today, Rumsfeld often expresses his distaste for leaks and for the press' handling of scandals such as the revelations of prison abuse at Abu Ghraib. Reflecting on Watergate last week, Rumsfeld made clear that he was not ready to declare Felt a hero. ... For the current president, Watergate reinforced a set of feelings that already ran deep in his family, said Peter Schweizer, co-author of "The Bushes: Portrait of a Dynasty." "They have always believed that secrecy and privacy were important for leadership, because they allow decisions to be made without fear of leaks or outside influences," said Schweizer, a research fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. To the Bush family, Watergate was "a personal failing by Nixon, not an institutional failing," Schweizer said. "Their view is that weakening the executive was the wrong solution to the problem."
Und sonst: Terrortipps von der US-Regierung: US-Behörde stoppt Studie über Milch-Vergiftung. Das US-Gesundheitsministerium hat erstmals in seiner Geschichte die Veröffentlichung eines Forschungsartikels aus Gründen der nationalen Sicherheit verhindert. Die Studie beschreibt detailliert, wie Terroristen Milchtransporte in den USA vergiften könnten, Spiegel Online

2 Comments:

At 4:48 nachm., Anonymous ursaminor said...

Hm, wo hier von Watergate die Rede ist: Mir fehlt hier irgendwie ein Kommentar zur Secret Downing Street Memo. Wie Norman Solomon in seinem Kommentar zu den aktuellen Implikationen der Watergate-Affäre bemerkt:

Last month, on May 1, exactly two years after Bush's top-gun appearance, the Times of London revealed the "Downing Street memo" -- instantly a huge story in the British press, but slow to gain any traction in major U.S. media outlets. Across the United States in early June, front pages filled up with stories about Deep Throat and the bygone Watergate era, but editors at major newspapers still couldn't spare prominent space for scrutiny of the Downing Street memo -- smoking-gun minutes from a top-level meeting of British officials convened by Prime Minister Tony Blair on July 23, 2002.
The memo makes clear that President Bush was lying when he publicly kept claiming that he hadn't decided yet whether to order an invasion of Iraq. Bush's actual policy was to launch the war, no matter what. In addition, the memo said, at the top of the administration in Washington "the intelligence and facts were being fixed around the policy."


Die - zumindest anfangs - ungenügende Erwähnung der Memo in den amerikanischen Medien wird durch eine praktische Nichterwähnung in z.B. den deutschen Medien reflektiert. Und dadurch, dass man selbst auf einem sonst zu gut informierten Blog wie diesem nichts dazu findet.

 
At 5:32 nachm., Blogger sk said...

danke für den hinweis auf das ukusa-gemauschel vor dem irak-krieg, war mir noch unbekannt -- auch wenn das ganze ja nicht mehr wirklich überrascht.

 

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